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was a member of the board of supervisors, all of us wondered why we hadn't done anything there and the mayor thought the same. >> if an earthquake happened, the building was uninhabitable. it sat there vacant for quite a while. the city decided to buy the building in 1999 for $2. we worked and looked at ways that we can utilize the building for an office building. to build an icon i can building that will house a lot of city departments. >> the san francisco public utilities commission has an important job. we provide clean, pristine public drinking water to 2.6 million people in the san francisco bay area from the hetch hetchy regional water system. with also generate clean renewable energy for city services like public buses, hospitals, schools, and much more. and finally, we collect and treat all the city's wastewater and stormwater making it safe enough to discharge into the san francisco bay and pacific ocean. >> in 2006 the puc was planning a record number of projects. >> the public utilities commission is a very infrastructure-rich organization. we're out there rebuilding the water sy
we use this. a silly puddy you put on if you have things of value you don't want breaking in an earthquake, grab this. all hardware stores have them. anybody have this at home? >> this is, why is this a hazard aside from it being in an earthquake? most of the home it is built in the city before the 1850's was meant for one socket not for a stereo and everything plugged into it it was meant for one item. hazardous material. this draino and different things, read the labels. it's important to know what you have in the home in case somebody injest it. make sure you know what you have so you don't cross contaminate. you don't want to put bleach next to ammonia. in a disaster if /taeu break and mix, what will happen. you will have a hazardous material place in your house. how about this? the typical garage. most people don't have gas in the suburbs you do. if you have lawn mowers. store it low. gas fumes will creep down to the bottom. if you have to store gas, store it mostly full. if you have an empty gas container -- if you want to protect yourself put cords across it so it
stations for alternative vehicles. >> it's time for us to have a home that all of us can be proud of. >> and we couldn't do this without everybody working together on the one goal, which is, let's build something that reflects the honor of hetch hetchy, the honor of the greatest engineering feats, reflects what our puc does for our public, and for generations to come it will educate everybody. >> i'm really proud that one of the greenest and most sustainable buildings is here in norm in district 6. the wind turbine, the solar power, the living machines, recycled water that ed and the mayor has already spoken to. and what's also amazing about this building is it's not just internally, but you can actually see it on the outside. so, when people are walking around the city they can actually see the green and environmental aspects. >> what better way to show that the puc cares about the environment and the puc is going to show everyone else, you can do this, too. and you can do it in a way that makes sense, that's affordable, and that is better for the environment. >> and this is the mos
francisco. thank you for joining us. it was nice to meet you. and thank you for telling us about your beautiful mural. thanks for watching "culturewire." >> san francisco is home to some of the most innovative companies of the 21st century. this pioneering and forward looking spirit is alive in san francisco government as well. the new headquarters of the san francisco public utilities commission at a5 25 golden gate avenue is more than just a 13-story building and office ablation. instead, city leaders, departments and project managers join forces with local architectural firms ked to build one of the greatest office buildings in america. that's more than a building. that's a living system. ♪ ♪ when san francisco first bought this land in 1999, it was home to a state office building. >> this was an old eight-story brown building the state owned and the workers' comp people were in that building. it was an old dee correctvth it building for decades. when i was a member of the board of supervisors, all of us wondered why we hadn't done anything there and the mayor thought the
. thank you so much. that was fantastic what you did for us. christopher stevens was obviously an extraordinary human being and contributor. every year at stanford we have a group of what we call national security fellows come. they were roughly army, navy, air force, state department. a couple weeks ago we had a meeting and the first person i called on was an army colonel. i said where were you last? he said in libya. i said did you know christopher stevens? he said everybody knew christopher stevens. he was our leader, fluent in arabic, constructive, positive, doing something, he was our leader. this spontaneous practically eruption from him. he was a foreign service officer. anybody who has served with a foreign service as i did as the secretary of state knows, what a very special group of people this is. they are very able people. dedicated. they work hard for our country. chris was extraordinary and stood out. i thought what image can i think of that might express our way of thinking about him. i thought of the great seal of our republic. i don't know how many of you have
in common is we use technology -- in our cases, an online platform -- that actually lowers the barrier -- the barrier of entry so people across the social spectrum can engage. you do not need to have a second home in a fancy condo buildings in this city. you can have an extra count that you want to rent out, and you can find access to travelers from all over the world who also do not have the resources to spend money on a $200 hotel bill who want to say on your couch, and that is really democratizing travel, not just access to travel, but also access to the tourism economy that flourishes in the city. >> i just want to address the technology point really quickly. we try and emphasize the human aspect of this, whether it is on the website or whether it is through the iphone app. other people use a device that we built, that lets you share a car more conveniently by letting the richer unlock the car with their smartphone. even with that, we really try to connect the people who are sharing because a lot of people to accept rentals just with the kit and may never meet the people they are s
to be a police department that you are comfortable calling before anything happens with out fear of having us say, no, we are going to shut it down. we want to work with you to make it happen, but it means as safely as possible. certainly, alcohol always played a role as well as the age of the patrons, and on and on. again, please give us a chance to further develop the trust that we have been building over the last several years. some of the questions that they ask, or issues that they speak to, like the alcohol licensing unit, that is because i heard you with regard to working with licenses, having security plans so there can be one pinpoint that everything can pass through. commanders are the successors and hopefully it will be around a while and always be resourced. it is really important that you take our input and that we come out for a safer event and that people are going to want to come to san francisco and that they will not have any trepidation again, i think the fact that everything is booming right now in san francisco would go a long way to say that we kind of got this thing figured
fully. what excites me about sharing is how it changes every day like for the better. it empowers us. the economic shift in the new businesses of creating and exchanging value is creating a new cultural narrative. it is replacing an old legacy narrative that was toxic. it told us the go live comes from shopping and competition -- it told us the good life comes from shopping in competition, from being free from each other. we are leading ving this because it has pushed us to the brink of extinction. it has enslaved as to debt. it is boring. it is spiritually empty. there is a news story being born in san francisco. it is one where the more you contribute to the common good, the more you are respected. the better you believe in committee, the more access to what you have -- the better you behave in a community, the more access you have. instead of judging each other, we help each other and realize our greatest potential. we open our world to each other. through doing that, we are liberated. we find freedom through our relationships. i have lived both of these stories. the old one almos
that initiative forward. mayor lee -- i also have the director of hud here and he is going to lead us and then we will have mayor lee up in a moment. >> thank you very much and it really is a privilege to be here with you today and to build on henry's comments and it's extraordinary that the grants across the country that were awarded to hud two of them are in the same state and it's more extraordinary that both of them are in the same city, san francisco so congratulations. [cheers and applause] so for context i just want to mention a few things and this is no news to all of you here in the room and the people standing up with me today, but today in america more than 10 million people are living in neighborhoods of concentrated poverty and limited investment and opportunities for themselves and their children, and we know that one of the most important factors in determining the economic and financial success of peoples whether or not a child grows up in those high poverty neighborhoods? a. the fact that we can predict health, education outcomes of children based on the zip code, where they live
. >> for us, i think the most important thing we are offering is something quintessentially san francisco. something that they cannot find anywhere else. we have two fetish fares in san francisco. there are only three other cities in the world that do that. new york, toronto, and berlin. i have been to all three and they are not nearly the same size as well we produced, or nearly as diverse. what we are always thinking about is what we are offering people that is so quintessentially san francisco that we get -- it cannot be gotten anywhere else. we are also told the switching of the entertainment this year. we have dance areas where the slides used to be. i think that for us it is about making sure that people, even if they came to san francisco in particular five years ago, that they are not experiencing the fight -- the same thing. it speaks to one of the priorities. the never-ending city. or something. i do not remember, exactly, but it is the same basic concept. even if you come here several times over and over, you will not have the same experience. as we do that, enhancing certain t
them -- nice to meet you. >> can you talk to me about a variety of products that use cell? >> we have these lovely constructed platters. we make these wonderful powder bowls. they can have a lot of color. >> york also using your license. -- you are also using your license. >> this means that i can register with the city. this makes sure that our family participated in making all of these. >> this comes by licensed artists. the person selling it is the person that made it. there is nothing better than the people that made it. >> i would like you to meet michael johnson. he has been in the program for over 8 years. >> nice to me you. what inspired your photography? >> i am inspired everything that i see. the greatest thing about being a photographer is being able to show other people what i see. i have mostly worked in cuba and work that i shot here in san francisco. >> what is it about being a street artist that you particularly like? >> i liked it to the first day that i did it. i like talking to mentum people. talking about art or anything that comes to our minds. there is more visib
can see he was offering his own form of enlightenment. he was guiding us away from the dark time known as the disco era. [ laughter] who knew that chris would work his timeless style for the next 34 years. look at the effect on me, who is wearing the button-down now that. was the first life lesson from chris. stick with the classics, they won't go out of style. that said, my wife has gently advised me the definition of a classic look does not extend to certain flannel shirts from 1982. our next topic on the less sons that we learned from chris back then involve culture. this is beyond the stereotypical fraternity life experience, because i was lucky enough to live with chris and another famous piedmonter austin tichner. talk about enlightening. he dubbed our large room the triple occupancy club. little did i know this came with the added bonus of an extracurricular education in the arts. chris arrived with his stack of lps, many courtesy of his step dad, bob. the chronicle music critic at the time. austin contributed his eclectic theater and comedy recordings and, well, himself. those
>>> my name is chris stevens, i'm the new u.s. ambassador to libya. i had the honor to serve as the envoy to the libyan revolution and i was thrilled to watch the libyan people stand up and demand their rights. now i'm excited to return to libya to continue the great work we've started, building a solid partnership between the united states and libya to help you the libyan people achieve your goals. right now i'm in washington, preparing for my assignment. as i walk around the monuments and memorials commemorating the courageous men and women that made america what it is, i'm reminded we too went through challenging periods, when america was divided by a bitter civil war 150 years ago. president abraham lincoln had the vision to pull us together toward a shared goal of peace and prosperity. growing up in california i didn't know much about the arab world. then after graduating from the university of california at berkeley, i traveled to north africa as peace corps engineer. i worked as an english teacher in morocco two years and quickly grew to love this part of the world. si
is a different world, isn't it? >> we have so many micro districts and pockets of different the used within two or three blocks. answering the question for one house may not always be the same as answering that question for different house. >> give us an idea. if you get a view, it will be different -- >> shore. the value of a simple remodel verses a very fancy kitchen remodel in a house that might be worth more than a condominium. those things can matter. it can make a difference. >> we have a request from one of our viewers to make sure we talk about -- home-improvement results and building taxes. >> accessible. >> the other thing that might be brought out his people over- improved. there is a fine line. i recommend that my client or anyone talk to realtors before they start. it is a good idea to get an idea of that neighborhood, that house, and how it can be done. >> page 22 of the handout, spend an hour with the pro. talk about what the value means and how it will add value to your home, or if it will be over spending on something that maybe you can do without. >> exactly. >> it is very imp
because they can't find jobs. so jobs has been a huge priority for us. trying to find -- trying to work with city agencies, with community-based organizations, to make sure that young people, especially, have opportunities to make choices in their lives. and so that is why we have been focused very much on job-training and wrap-around services in that respect also. i think there are older adults and other folks who also could use additional employment. so i think jobs is a big issue for me. >> miss johnson? >> i agree that it's difficult to pick just one issue. but i think a lot of our policy issues that we're having, that you have in front of us come from a lack of accountable. where is your money being spent? how is it being spent? there is a lot of mismanagement. and there is a lot of money that goes places we don't know where it's going. and you can see it running through all of this discussion of all of the polices. are our elected officials making policy decisions that are sustainable? that promote equity? or are they for-sale to the highest bidder? these are the things that
. lagos. >> yes. i want to thank everybody for coming out tonight and enduring us, and i just want to let you know that in my opinion district seven needs a progressive in this upcoming election i believe i'm that person. i came in second in 2008. i am the only candidate up here that ran in 2008. garnered 19% of the vote and i came in second, and i believe that we need to make our city affordable again for working people, the middle class people. it's not an affordable place to live anymore for most working people so that is something i will work on. and i will oppose major land use development because i believe it's a threat to the preservation of our neighborhoods. it's gentifies our city and it makes it basically a hostile place to live in my opinion especially living out in park merced so if you have a progressive on november 6 vote for me. thank you. >> thank you. ms. gavin. >> i am lynn gavin and i'm a pastor and like so many women there are multiple things that i do and we multi-task and kind of boring even though we didn't term that world. i am running because of the corrup
the fire. how many people have used a fire extinguisher before. >> may be 10 percent of you. by the end of the week you will be putting out a fire with a fire extinguisher. you don't want to learn out to house an extinguisher when they big fire is in front of you. when you turn off your natural gas and water. hazardous materials will be talked about next week. 35-40 percent of you. you will find out that all of you have hazardous material in your home. the third week is disaster medicine. you, going into a room spending 45 seconds on one person into 3 life saving techniques. by the fourth we we will teach you as search and rescuers how to keep yourself safe by identifying safe and none safe building to go into. sometimes objects are too heavy for you to liftoff of a body. we will teach you privying which will use anything you have, wood or cement blocks so you is see that people can lift heavy objects off of people. now, you have to have a plan. every program needs to have a plan. we can't say, here are your skills. class 6, after half an hour we will split you into teams of 10 people
million people live in the united states. and each person uses an average of 100 gallons of water every day. man: what it takes to actually make clean water is somewhat a mystery to most customers. woman: so how does water get from the river into your house, or here at school? woman: somebody has to bring that water to us, and somebody has to take it away when we're finished with it. man: the water infrastructure is vital for disease protection, fire protection, basic sanitation, economic development, and for our quality of life. man: you just can't visualize all the assets that are under our feet. we have about two million miles of pipe in this nation. if you're walking around in an urban area, you're probably stepping on a pipe. man: our grandparents paid for, and put in for the first time, these large distribution systems. woman: and in many cases, it's not been touched since. man: we're at a critical turning point. much of that infrastructure is wearing out. narrator: our water infrastructure is made up of complex, underground systems that function continuously. these 10 locations t
who have those fees who aren't using it for reimbursement and other costs that we take those fees and use them for appropriate purposes. >> mr. resignato. >> thank you chris for the health question, i will give you the $5 i owe you. [ [ laughter ] >> absolutely healthy sf is the program that created universal health coverage in san francisco. it's amazing. the problems we have had, we have had are people taking their children to the emergency rooms for primary care. and we're eliminating that through programs that make sure that everybody has health insurance. so yes, i agree with this. and i think it needs to be expanded and it's relatively cheap. and my entire public health career has been in prevention. and what happens is when people have health insurance and they are seeing a doctor on a regular basis or health care provider and getting preventative services, that saves us so much money in the end. and also, for these businesses that are having to pay, their employees will be healthier. so it's a win-win in every situation and we need to really expand and i agree with thi
something we can use as cribbing. don't lift yet. you don't want to lift until you are ready. lift slowly, on 3. 1, 2, 3. . >> the fulcrum is under the cribbing. >> put it back on the patient. get them out. we're going to show you 4 rescue carries. one of the rescue carries, we're actually going to have you do it, it's a blanket drag. something good if you are by yourself and you have to get somebody out, you get a blanket or a sheet or a throw rug. works well on this kind of floor, doesn't work well on carpet. a chair is a similar type carry. if you put them on a chair, it works much better. works great on stairs. last thing we're going to show you is an improvised blanket stretcher, how to carry somebody long distances. you want to use at least 4 people or 6, however many hands you can get on them. . >> grab that, make sure it's past their head. pull that out but only on the count. >> okay, on the count of 3. 1, 2, 3, roll. >> okay, now while you have this person up, remember, about halfway, roll the person back. now you guys do it. you are going to grab the legs. >> count of 3,
is, as well. we use what is available us, as far as being retailers and trying to influence people. there is a walk ability score that shows your property, how green it is by being close to services and close two stores, schools, and the walk ability -- walkability. they're doing that across the country and it is coming up in marketing. when green comes in, we are pushing for green designations and the work people do to make their house green. >> my own direct experience, generally, the buying public will not pay more if it is green. maybe that is something people don't want to hear. it is the honest truth. that is my own direct experience. i think it is absolutely -- what will happen with the current green movement in building, is that it will become standard. it is becoming the standard. ultimately, it will be frowned upon when a house does not have these features, i think. i think that is how it will migrate into society, in that way. it is a good thing. it is becoming an awareness of all of these things, your appliances, your window rating, things like that. it is something tha
homelessness and build affordable housing and build the schools and keep us safe. i am running for supervisor to keep san francisco real. our city is a social, economic and political cross roads. in so many ways, the every-day people that keep this city special, the artists, the students, the young families, the seniors on fixed income, working people and every day people of all strides are having a harder and harder time surviving much less thriving in our city. one of the reasons is that our economic development policies are currently much too focused on the big business interest. we need to reorient our city's development policies to focus on the 80 percent of the economy which is our small businesses or mom and pop shops. san francisco needs to develop more affordable housing. the association of bay government says that they need 18,000 new units of housing and we are nowhere close to that. prop c, something that i encourage you to vote for, but let's go back to the ballot in the years to come and pass an affordable housing bond something that san francisco has not done in close to two de
you pull up to an incident or you see something, you take a breath, assess the situation, use all your senses and think about what you are going to do. those are all components of what we call the size-up. there are many components to size up. what's one of the components to size up? gathering facts. you want to assess the type of damage there is. what kind of situation is it? what is the issue? is it a medical problem? if it's a medical, is it a big hurt or a little hurt? is it a rescue situation and if it's a fire, do you have the resources to control or extinguish that fire? how about your situation, do you have all your people? do you have all the resources that you need? have you collected all the material that you need if you are going to start doing a lifting exercise because someone is trapped? because you never start a rescue, you never start a lifting exercise, never start anything, unless you know you are going to be able to finish it, have enough of the resources to do it. and do you have the right equipment? you need specialized equipment? do you have access to that? maybe
: this is a desert, and it has its own beauty, but you have to get beyond what you're used to. as long as people recognize they're moving to the desert and give up this notion that they have to bring eastern vegetation with them and make the necessary adaptations in their own life, desert communities can continue to live. man: the biggest water user in the desert is turf. turf uses a lot of irrigation and uses spray irrigation, so what we've done here is use artificial turf. you're never going to be able to achieve the look of back east or the look of, say, california, with subtropical plants, but our landscapes are still lush and use about 30% of what the subtropical landscape with turf would use. las vegas has adopted a drought tolerant ordinance. we're using less water today than we used five years ago, despite over 300,000 new residents. i think it's a pretty amazing example as to how a town can really turn on a dime if there's the political will and if the public gets behind it. narrator: even the casinos and resorts have adapted to efficient water use. mulroy: the las vegas strip uses only
agree with him and the issue that is largest faces us in san francisco are the economy and there are two parts to that and creating jobs and trying to get an economy going that is sustainable and can take care of the unfunded liabilities that we have that are so large. we have $323 million in unfunded liabilities for our health care, and i agree with him again on the pension issue. we absolutely have to do something about it. what i would imagine what we have to do is examine whether or not we need to find benefits or contributions, maybe we need people to retire at a later age, whether people continue to retire and have the pay at $300,000 rather than 150. >> thank you sir. ms. gavin. >> for me the issue in regards to policy that i think many of us know is malfeasance and corruption at city hall. i think that the back room deals that city hall is doing adversely impacts every person in this room. i don't know if you are aware we have not had a sunshine committee in the past four months, and sunshine gives all the right to redress government and it's our open government that you the
♪ ♪ [dog barking] [rocket whistles] [boom] >> thank you for joining us tonight. i am the government policy director at spur. it is my distinct pleasure to welcome such an amazing panel as well as the mayor of our fine city. this is the innovation mayor, mayor ed lee. [applause] >> thank you. can everyone here me? welcome to spur. i enjoy being here because every time i come here, some part of my brain wakes up that has not been woken up before. i am here to welcome you. earlier, i had a wonderful opportunity to exchange with our panel members about what they are doing and how they're doing it. . i think these panel members are here as part of their own entrepreneurial spirit. they own companies but love the city. they know the spirit of the city is one of innovation, that invites peoples and views, and smashes them -- meshes them together to see if we can make an even better san francisco. we have two other supervisors who may be coming later. we're all part of the initial group of policymakers at city hall who want to hear news views and ideas on the new collaborative economy. we'r
going to use my chance just to ask one last question. do you believe that you have marked fashion history? >> it is difficult to say. is it my purpose? i do not know. i think that's everybody is marking fashion history in a way. as much as journalists because they show the people. what is fashion history? some old clothes that you can find may be in the free-market? books, magazines, newspapers? i think that i am part of that, but to think that me, i'm mark -- i do not think so. it is not exactly my purpose. it really seems very selfish to do what you love. >> i'm glad i managed more or less to silence you with my question. [laughter] i would like to say that i believe you have marked fashion history in the best way by creating clothes, which have been a mirror to society as it changed and as it happened, and you will be known for that as much as for the beauty of the close. thank you so much for giving us the chance to talk to you. [applause] [applause] announcer: b dreams and good grades aren't enough to get into college. there are actual steps you need to take. finding someone
on the sunshine task force and we had a lot of members of public come in front of us, looking for reasons why all of these projects were overbudget and i think there is a lot of waste there government. we just talked about the hetch hetchy matter and building was supposed to be $140 million, but it was actually $65 million over budget. the department of public works doesn't even have all of its receipts. the bond oversight committee is supposed to be have access to those receipts. they can't get them. so we ce[6ud money is not accounted for. we found waste in the arts commission, which the controllers office confirmed and the civil grand jury confirm and we also found waste in various other departments. and this board of supervisors needs people on it who will actually ask those questions. thank you. we have a couple other candidates who wanted to jump in here. mr. davis and miss selby. >> after $1.5 billion in public service sector cuts in san francisco since 2008, since our budget crisis, we can't balance our budget going forward on cuts alone. we have got to look for revenue with muni faili
protection. gloves, eye protection, and masks and sanitation and hand washing and who among us don't have a nick or a cut on their hand and are you going to touch someone's blood and your in tac skin will protect you from most ilknows. however, if you have a cut on your hand you have a path for infection to get inside of you and you want a pair of latex gloves -- several pairs of glo gloves that you can put on and change as you go from patient t patient hopefully and at least wash your hands and disinfect your hands between patient contacts and the eyes are like an open wound and path to get into your body and glasses and take the old glasses and throw them in your kit and you have something to wear and face mask and of course dust and dirt and all of these disasters throw up dust and dirt and especially in a dryer season and push comes t shove a band da bandana. and after a disaster is not the time to let your hygiene slip and it's a time to tighten it u and communitycable diseases and if it's wet and not yours don't touch it. gloves and every patient contac and don't touch blood and it'
and allow those people to be allowed to use the parking permits to park on meters in shopping areas so i would propose that i am definitely opposed to send meters and saturday meters. it's a deterrent to patronizing small business. >> okay. the resulting economy has resulted in internet base for short term rentals and many of the rentals are illegal and the hotel tax is not collected. should the city legalize some or all of the arrangements and collect a hotel tax and we will begin with you -- i will be glad to repeat the question. >> i honestly don't know how you would enforce a law like that. of course everyone should pay their fair share but i don't know how you could enforce that. i believe we should standardize the inlaw units, maybe sure they're up to code and regulate any new units but as far as taxation i cannot see how you could actually enforce that and collect the taxes on it. >> thank you sir. mr. yee. >> cheryl i just want to make sure -- >> i can repeat it. there is internet base market for short base rentals and they sublease units to visitors and tourists and many are
, they rust. they get to where you turn them on and nothing happens. but it is so totally used in every nook and cranny, that making any accommodation to shut it down, to do something to it, is very difficult. narrator: two massive underground tunnels, called simply tunnel 1 and tunnel 2, provide most of the city's water supply. they run hundreds of feet below manhattan, far deeper than the subways. built at the beginning of the 20th century, they are concrete-lined and bored through solid rock. they could last centuries. but the mechanical equipment within them will not. engineers in the 1950s discovered rust on the tunnel's valves. there were concerns that if they closed the valves for tunnel inspections, they may never open again, leaving new york city without water. so they chose to keep them open. as a result, there has not been significant inspection, maintenance, or repair of the tunnels in decades. no one knows their current condition. hurwitz: currently, city tunnel 1 and city tunnel number 2 would be feeding each half of the city. so you'd lose half the city if you didn't have a re
, that actually was very much a reflection of what was going on when you did it. can you tell us about those madonna corset years? >> yes, it is a kind of a reflection of what is happening. also a reflection of -- [unintelligible] it means i have been educated with women. when were very important for me, my grandmother, my mother. they give me and show me threw themselves an example of what women wear. women that were strong, a clever, human. and at the same time, sometimes stronger than men. so that i realized very quickly that women could be more interesting, more clever, because of maybe education or maybe because of the fact that they have not played football, to be quiet, you know, more into things to obtain. to obtain something. they have to be 10 times more clever than the men. they have everything it themselves already at the base. >> that we already know we are 10 times more intelligent. [laughter] >> yes. i mean, like, men did not realize that most of the time. even if the need. the need, you know. so that, you know, truly, i felt the power of the woman. at the time, also like the
+.ó boston, wens iris or boy we are allvgá÷ san franciscans. some of us are natives, like my daughters.yothers are immigrante imcome babt and myself. over the next four years as5j san franciscans, we will all expend $25 billion. i would like to see that money used to make this wind and fog swept peninsula the best that it has ever been. $25 billion is an enormous fortune and in four years time that investment could find all of our citizens on the same page, and make san francisco the envy of the world. i support projects that we all favor, and will facilitate such projects if elected, rather than ill-conceived, divisive projects like the central subway or eight washington street. i pledge, if elected as your supervisor, to serve the entire four years in that office. will the 9q make that same pledttremember ty considered being appointed as the district attorney, and run unsuccessfully for mayor twice. will he run again in 2014 for the state assembly? the incumbent, if reelected, may be real estat replaced by an apd supervisor for half the next term. i find that unacceptable in our demo
merced where it's high and i believe those units should be used to house homeless people with the revenue generates from the war profits tax so that's what i would propose in dealing with the homeless issue. >> all right. thank you sir. mr. rogers. >> you know sadly the 50% of the homeless are actually vietnam veterans and so this makes homelessness really a national embarrassment. in the past they had post traumatic stress disorder was claimed to be -- the people had it before they were in war, before they went through a terribly difficult time and they did not provide the people any money. fortunately with the obama administration this has changed and these people are coming back and being able to be given some money, so on the federal level i think there's some improvement. when it comes to san francisco i think we need to do more, and i would research this further and answer that question later. thank you. >> all right thank you sir. >> i am under the assumption i'm a problem solver. first you have to identify the problem and i would lump this into three groups. you have people wh
so i will put aside my taxation reservations and vote yes on a. >>> public safety, using a number of methods let's encourage our police and firefighters to live here in the city. we will have another earthquake and we need them here, not up in pet lululemon a, not down in half moon bay. speaking of earthquakes are you prepared? >>> right choice voting, like it or not it will be a factor in this race. i hope you'll choose me in this race. if you're already committed please consider me for second or third. whether you vote for me or not, please just be sure to vote. it's our right, it's our privilege and frankly i believe it's our duty and i won't tell you who to vote for for president, but my candidate handled don't ask don't it will and we share. thank you very much. >> my name is francis xavier crowley. as a district 7 native, i want to represent the twin peaks neighborhoods because i care about the community i grew up in and want to serve my fellow residents. my record as a dedicated public servant, community volunteer and leader of the international alliance of theatrical demon
on who they are, but it is not a question of color. for me, both of us were beautiful. and i loved color. color of the skin. tattoo on the skin, which is a kind of color. some blue colors that you add. and i wanted to show that. when i started, i remember that there were some beautiful girls. they're beautiful. but i felt like, ok, but there is also beauty. i have a girlfriend which was modeling for me that i met very early when i started that was from a french colony. she was beautiful and black and very inspiring, very nice. i say, yes, why not. for me, a difference was beautiful. they looked to me, and i wanted to show it. another kind of different was the fact that when i saw farida, i said, my god, she is incredible. i was very impressed by her beauty. very frightened even by her beauty. she was kind of a very arrogant imperial. and african and beauty with a special expression. not arrogant. but beautiful. i said, i want to show this girl which is different. does not know how to walk as a model. they have their own personality. i remember this year i was asking a professional model
legislation. there's no conditional use requirement to have this. a lot of people today want to have food, drink, and be able to have some music. how can we get the limited live entertainment excluded from the know amplified or no live entertainment excluded on the transfers? >> that is going to mostly driven locally. most of the conditions you'll ever see on an abc license are because we rely, to a great extent, on the police department and local officials to determine what is best for their communities. i'm not trying to pin this on you guys or blame you guys, but we do try to work with you. we do not tend to want to overrule the police department very often. now that said, i get a fair number of petitions and appeals to me. typically, they are from the neighbors. i want to see that there is actually a practical problem posed -- that the condition is there to solve, not that this is the way the things have been or maybe there's someone who is satisfied by what is potentially wrought by having live entertainment. it is always a case by case. generally, very deferential -- i am very defer
. this is just really a big, community win and a celebration for us all. >> to learn more about the helen diller playground in dolores park, go to sfrecpark.org.
opportunity there for us to collaborate. there's a lot of companies hopping up in a specific space looking at the problem. i am advising a new company called project trust, which has no product yet, but just a general mission statement around this area, which you might find interesting. i would say there is a lot of innovation that needs to happen there, and i think we can all work together to help cultivate trust across communities. >> i will push back a little bit. i do not think trust is as big a barrier as what i have been hearing. a recent study by a pr firm found that trust in big institutions is at an all-time low and that with that is an increase in trust in individuals and trust in each other, right? i think that is a huge opportunity. this is why it is happening, i think, and the sharing economy is emerging now. part of the reason it is happening is that social media is sort of like sharing training wheels, you know? you can share a link or remix a video with people from around the world and see how will it was, and it is easy and low-cost and not risky, but there's a certain log
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